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Knights of Columbus

St. Charles Council #2084

P.O. Box 213, Greenville, Michigan  48838

Corpus Christi Sunday

Fr. Bauer Celebrates Corpus Christi Sunday at St. Charles.

The institution of Corpus Christi as a feast in the Christian calendar resulted from approximately forty years of work on the part of Juliana of Liège, a 13th-century Norbertine canoness, also known as Juliana de Cornillon, born in 1191 or 1192 in Liège, Belgium, a city where there were groups of women dedicated to Eucharistic worship. Guided by exemplary priests, they lived together, devoted to prayer and to charitable works. Orphaned at the age of five, she and her sister Agnes were entrusted to the care of the Augustinian nuns at the convent and leprosarium of Mont-Cornillon, where Juliana developed a special veneration for the Blessed Sacrament.

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She always longed for a feast day outside of Lent in its honour. Her vita reports that this desire was enhanced by a vision of the Church under the appearance of the full moon having one dark spot, which signified the absence of such a solemnity. In 1208, she reported her first vision of Christ in which she was instructed to plead for the institution of the feast of Corpus Christi.

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The vision was repeated for the next 20 years but she kept it a secret. When she eventually relayed it to her confessor, he relayed it to the bishop

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Juliana also petitioned the learned Dominican Hugh of St-Cher, and Robert de Thorete, Bishop of Liège. At that time bishops could order feasts in their dioceses, so Bishop Robert ordered in 1246 a celebration of Corpus Christi to be held in the diocese each year thereafter on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday.

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Hugh of St-Cher travelled to Liège as Cardinal-Legate in 1251 and, finding that the feast was not being observed, reinstated it. In the following year, he established the feast for his whole jurisdiction (Germany, Dacia, Bohemia, and Moravia), to be celebrated on the Thursday after the Octave of Trinity (one week later than had been indicated for Liège), but with a certain elasticity, for he granted an indulgence for all who confessed their sins and attended church "on a date and in a place where [the feast] was celebrated".

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These pictures are of the Procession at St. Charles on Corpu Christi Sunday.

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These pictures are of the Procession at St. Charles on Corpu Christi Sunday.

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These pictures are of the Procession at St. Charles on Corpu Christi Sunday.

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Fr. Wyse Celebrates the Corpus Christi Mass at St. Joseph's.  These pictures are of the Procession at St. Joseph's on Corpus Christi Sunday.  

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These pictures are of the Procession at St. Joseph's on Corpus Christi Sunday.

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These pictures are of the Procession at St. Joseph's on Corpus Christi Sunday.